Tag Archives: Business Objectives

Chris Brogan & Success-Benchmarks, Business Objectives & Balance!

I woke up this morning to this post from Chris Brogan and the accompanied video:


I found myself responding to Chris with “Chris, I think success is finding balance in life between professional success and family time. Just saying…” Success to me is finding balance between professional success and being a good son, significant other, friend, sibling and when I get married- a great husband and father. From there I looked at some official Chris Brogan stats:

  1. Blog Ranked 11,725 in the world of Alexa.com
  2. 4,865 friends on Facebook
  3. 103,325 followers on Twitter

When I look at those numbers I think “critical mass”. Chris has in fact reached critical mass! Any brand that builds and maintains a following such as above is sure to have success. Yes, getting up at 5AM is necessary, but at what cost? Your family, your passions, your time on this earth? It is one thing to work hard (I work many 12 hour days), but I also feel like I do well by the people I care most about- including myself. Which leads me to why I wrote what I wrote to Chris. Success is balance. Not only in life, but also your profession. We live in a complex world where technology is invading our humanity if we let it. It is up to us to focus on the bottom line which is making a living with Social Media being the enabler.

These observations got me thinking about the obvious need to having a brand strategy. Burnout can happen if you don’t set:

  1. Project  benchmarks (what do when you have critical mass)
  2. Map every action to qualified business objectives
  3. And once you have critical mass- focus only on your bottom line which is new recognized revenue and reaching attainable business goals

From where I sit, Chris has reached critical mass and should only be spending time where his valuable time is paid for. And maybe that is the case, maybe he is getting up after 3 hours of sleep and the next 18 hours he is getting paid for. Who knows, but the valuable lesson is Social Media takes time, commitment, resources, unique content, a plan (realistic benchmarks and business objectives), execution and inevitably the need to find qualitative business value – or recognized revenue or business opportunities. If you and your organization execute on all of those items, I suspect you will be able to find the balance I alluded to already. If you don’t, your life can be lost upon you and you spend much too much time working when you should be enjoying being young and capable. Trust me, I have worked late and on weekends, more then I would like to admit. I have yet to find the balance either, but I at least can recognize that my success benchmark is balance. A novel goal for any business or professional working with the social business realm!

Do yourself the favor and spend some time with the people closest to you today. As for Chris, best wishes buddy- hopefully we can plan out that Trust Agents book signing at the Andover Bookstore. I know how you love your indie bookstores! Be well and safe travels.

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We Are Each A Brand – Twitter Best Practices For Anyone!

twitterbrandI was flipping through ESPN the magazine last night when I was reminded of a disturbing trend. Aaron Curry of the Seattle Seahawks has a Twitter handle of @SeaHawk59. What is worse is Stephen Curry, a soon to be drafted NBA player, has a handle of @classof2027.  My question to both would be, how are people supposed to find you if they actually wanted to follow you? How is Google supposed to attach your Twitter feed to your search rankings? As it stands now, when you Google “Stephen Curry” his Twitter address does not appear within the first 50 search results. I gave up after 5 clicks on the next tab. Not good, and certainly not good for his Twitter presence. A SEO nightmare by his own creation!

This got me thinking about how companies can  utilize Twitter more efficiently. Really the same way athletes should, but don’t!  An athlete’s name is not their brand due to free agency. Sales is nothing more than real world free agency. With that in mind-I have compiled a list of Twitter best practices with an eye on maximizing your companies brand on Twitter, and ultimately driving brand awareness and affinity:

  1. Twitter users are 37% more likely to be followed when they spell out their full name instead of attaching their brand to their username. With that data in hand, I suggest that your company have one corporate username and all other employees make their user name an extension of the company’s brand. This will allow your company to be able to speak to all business avenues -instead of being pigeon-holed based on his/her username.
  2. Every piece of content created in blogs, Youtube, Flickr, deep discussions, new events- need to be shared on Twitter. We suggest connecting Friendfeed to the corporate Twitter account.
  3. I suggest your company share tidbits of knowledge daily. At least 10 twitter posts per day using keywords from a yet to be established keyword list. 60% should be of the thought leadership variety, while 40% of the posts should talk about the Twitter personality’s life. The corporate account should be purely talking about company  happenings and posting links for “link juice”, while responding to mentions. Always post an opinion on industry specific news.
  4. I suggest creating a template thank you note for every new follower. This template will link to the company’s website and be accompanied by a  thank you with a clear call to action.
  5. I suggest your company closely monitors the Twitter members that are talking about the organization on http://www.search.twitter.com. Track the results by simply copying the RSS feed of the results and placing it in an RSS reader.
  6. Your organization should comment on other posts of interest as much as time allows. This opens up free flowing conversations. The organization can track these conversations by keyword and put the RSS feeds into a Netvibes to follow effectively.

Summary:

  1. One Corporate Account (example @authoritydomain)- At least 10 Tweets a day (60% business/40% casual & fun- be a human) Attach a trending term: Example #authoritydomains. If you are a Mets fan: #Mets
  2. Numerous Individual Twitter accounts–For example put http://www.authoritydomains.com in the BIO, spell out full name (example: @derekshowerman). Shot for 10 Tweets a day, 60% business/40% casual & fun- be a human!
  3. Follow other Twitter folks who mention your business on http://search.twitter.com
  4. Thank every follower and have a clear call to action.

Suggestion:

Please be sure to engage social media with an eye on fulfilling real business objectives and a roadmap to see real ROI. Please let me know if you have any questions.


Ping Pong Props & Setting Business Objectives/Benchmarks

Thanks to Chris Angus for the props and kind words. He is regarded as one of the Top 100 Online Marketers in the world and is currently ranked at #2 in the UK.  Here is what he has to say…

Social Media with a Twist of Business

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Social Media is still relatively new and not understood very well and being successful is still something of a “dark art”. I think a lot of “social media experts” consider themselves a kind of artist. They write or build something pretty creative (if it’s going to be successful) and then promote it. If they get the mix of creativity and interest right whilst following the rules that you need to appeal to Social Media geeks then it will probably be a “success” and garner a high volume of traffic.

That’s kind of how these people sell themselves, “We’ll create something awesome and it’ll go popular and get a bunch of traffic and maybe some bloggers will link to it” – and that’s where it ends for most people selling their “Social Media Expert” services.

There is usually one vital element missing: Business. What’s the point or the end game? Well, I found a unique blog which makes sense of all this stuff and actually brings a side of sense and reality to social media.

The blog owner and writer is called Derek Showerman, looking at his blog and playing a bit of email Ping Pong, he seems to be a very switched on kid *ahem* (okay, he looks too old to get asked for ID) with an excellent business grounding who’s going to do great things in this crazy world of Social Media.

Social Media needs good people like this in the industry, this is for two reasons:

1. There are too many people that don’t know how to produce a good ROI for a client.

2. We need people that know what they are doing to produce positive results which will be good for the ecology of Social Media and bring a lot of good work in for the industry as a whole.

Happy Social Media Marketing!

The only items I will add to this post is that it is important to:

  1. Map to attainable business objectives
  2. Set realistic benchmarks for success

Most of my work, at the outset, is nailing down the items above-while setting up process and expectation that make sense for the business. Every business is unique in this respect. But the need to do so remains the same every time….without fail!

Thanks again Chris for the kind words.


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